Far-flung Species

Niles Eldredge said, “humans provide a great example of a far-flung (global) species that has visibly – and genetically – diverged over 100,000-200,000 years.” (2004) I endorse the Out of Africa Theory that homo sapiens evolved in Africa and then migrated in many directions into Europe, Asia, and eventually across the entire globe. We have always been a wandering wanderlust species where various groups physically meandered out of Africa thousands of years ago to settle and find their place on Earth. I advance the notion that each one of us is a roaming vagabond who is psychologically and physically attempting to fine our place in the world. I declare the Out of Africa Theory denotes that all humans have links with our primogenitor African relatives. Cro-Magnon man had a brain size and anatomical skeletal structure similar to us, and is considered to be the first homo sapien. I am interested in the fact, and enjoy studying that on our evolutionary path to become homo sapiens there were human-like species  we interbreed with and we now have anywhere from 10-20 stretches of their DNA on our genome. The Neanderthals and Denisovans are two examples of our mixed relative genetic heritage. It is estimated that genetically a typical European or Asian has 2-4% Neanderthal DNA in their genome. From the Neanderthals we borrowed a gene called OCA2 (formally referred to as P gene) that affects skin color, and we also inherited their genetic material that strengthened the human immune system. Over thousands of years we have become a far-flung species with a global diaspora that has had a dramatic increase in human population, and some argue will have Malthusian consequences.

population growth